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All event-related inquiries can be sent to our Director of Events, Liz Hottel , at events politics-prose. The Den opens at 8 a. Skip to main content. Search form Search. Advanced Search. Paul Dickson - Words from the White House. Saturday, January 19, - pm to pm. From tin can Washington to bully pulpit Teddy Roosevelt to snowmageddon , chief executives have changed the way we speak.

Non Fiction. By Paul Dickson. Not Signed or Personalized.

November 24, pm. David J. Politics and Prose at Union Market. This book sounded pretty interesting based on last month's review in the Washington Post, and it started off with a strong introduction the strongest part of the book. However, after the intro, it went into an alphabetized list of words and phrases "coined or popularized by America's Presidents" as the title says which was written in a very dry, clinical style, whereas I'd originally thought I'd be able to include this on my "humor" shelf.

And while it was interesting to discover the occas This book sounded pretty interesting based on last month's review in the Washington Post, and it started off with a strong introduction the strongest part of the book. And while it was interesting to discover the occasional nugget of interest -- such as various presidents usually Washington, Jefferson or the Roosevelts being the first to use words like "tin can," "pedicure," "indoors," "counterproductive" and "iffy;" or such phrases as "gulf stream" and "loose cannon" -- the vast majority of the entries were no surprise, but were the expected phrases like "New Deal," "moral equivalent of war," "compassionate conservatism," etc.

So overall I'd been expecting more, but it did make for a quick and mildly informative read. What was most best about the whole book, however, was learning that Abraham Lincoln was the first person on record using the word "cool" as we use it today. Jan 21, Philip rated it really liked it. I wish it was more or less an "essay" than a dictionary, but still incredibly interesting to know where we get some of our greatest Americanisms.

Bush yes, George W.

In the Words of the Presidents

Jan 17, Jim rated it really liked it Shelves: It is the the only way to give a language copiousness and euphony. Published earlier this month by Walker and Company, Words from the White House is an alphabetical listing of words and phrases either coined newly minted? Which President was the first to be wounded in battle? For example, probably obvious to some, maybe many, is the origin for the naming of the famous New York City street — Madison Ave.

Yes, it was named, like the Wisconsin capital city of Madison for our fourth president after his death in Club during his Campaign. This book is a delightful addition to a coffee table or Trivial Pursuit discussion of the American Presidency. Note: I received a complimentary copy of the book from the publisher. I was not required to write a review of it.

Words from the White House - Paul Dickson - Google Books

I chose to write a review. Answer to the question go the first American President to be wounded in battle? James Monroe Feb 15, Bill Patton rated it it was amazing. If you like politics and if you enjoy learning about where American political words come from, then this slim little book is up your alley.

Word for Word: White House on President's Knowledge of Adult Film Star Settlement (C-SPAN)

I saw Dickson on 'morning joe' on msnbc and I determined to get the book. Got it from Amazon and I read it in a day or two. Excellent read. Quick, informative, and easy to read.

KIRKUS REVIEW

One to keep on your reference shelf at home Loved the book. Jun 09, Aloysius rated it liked it. Some of the words, like "Founding Fathers", came from unexpected presidencies. Some, like "Anglophobia", came from predictable presidencies. And some, like "decider", are from presidential origins already known to me. In any case, it's nice to know that the president can serve not only as head of state, commander of the armed forces, and chief executive, but also as chief neologist.

Words from the White House: Words and Phrases Coined or Popularized by America’s Presidents

Jul 28, Jake Williams rated it really liked it. You've gotta remember that this reads like a dictionary, but this book is chock full of really incredible information from some of the most quotable human beings in history. I especially enjoyed all of the quotes attributed to Theodore Roosevelt, and the fact that a lot of George W.

Bush's quotes were actually not malopropisms, but rather references to words from the 16th century. Whether Bush intended to do that or not is still up for debate. Jun 24, Elizabeth added it. I loved this book because it detailed a lot of common phrases in use today and from which president it originated. I do think including the phrase "Obamacare" was unnecessary because it is easy to know how that phrase originated. I did love, however, how the word "Creep" originated from Richard Nixon's presidential campaign! Jan 23, Jill rated it liked it. Interesting read - who knew that commonly used words like cheerleader, mulligan and loose cannon originated with our "founding fathers"?


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Warren Harding gets credit for coining this phrase. Aug 15, Joy rated it it was amazing Shelves: nonfiction. As someone who loves words and is also intrigued by the crazy world of politics, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I read it from cover to cover, but readers can easily pick and choose the parts they want to read. I was surprised by many of the word origins in this book. Apr 11, Christa Van rated it liked it.

Great slice of history. Very attractive to "wordies".

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May 18, Jenny rated it really liked it. Interesting to find out how much of our common language originated with U. It was an enlightening book and fun to read. Try it out. Feb 22, Myk Walker rated it really liked it.


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A quick read full of interesting anecdotes. Apr 02, David Carlson added it Shelves: